Updates, commentary, training and advice on immigration and asylum law

Slight tweaks

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Naval (sic) gazing

I’ve made a few slight changes to the blog I thought I ought to explain. The UKBA press department has gone mad in recent months and produces so much garbage it drowns out the other items in the news feed. I’ve therefore separated it out into its own box. I might also filter out the various UKBA enforcement announcements bollocks (it’s all very¬†Two Minutes) but not tonight. I’ve promoted the much-clicked-upon BAILII case law feed to the top of the left hand panel but limited it to five items, which is usually enough to see anything new.

On the right hand side, the HJT Training advert is back with news of the upcoming annual judicial review conference (and will continue to come and go at the top of the right hand column to promote upcoming courses or conferences), and I’ve also made explicit my links with HJT in a new Training page.

I’m getting a bit bored of the orange theme and the current blog design generally and am considering another re-vamp – which is a decent excuse for another of these gimmicky poll things:

[polldaddy poll=2302626]

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The Free Movement blog was founded in 2007 by Colin Yeo, a barrister at Garden Court Chambers specialising in immigration law. The blog provides updates and commentary on immigration and asylum law by a variety of authors.

Comments

3 Responses

  1. The future’s bright. But not orange. Do i win a prize for being first to waste keyboard time typing that?Thumbs-up for filtering UKBA-prop into it’s own muddy stream.